ASBP Cohort 3 Steer Carcase Grading Completed

January 6, 2016 2:26 pm

The final mob of Angus Sire Benchmarking Program (ASBP) steers were processed and carcases graded across the 25th and 26th of November 2015. Overall, 581 steers have been processed for this ASBP Cohort coming from 5 ASBP co-operator herds.

Striploin samples from each carcase have been submitted to the University of New England (UNE) Meat Science Laboratory for testing for a range of beef quality traits including shear force and chemically extracted intra-muscular fat (IMF). Once the results are returned, the grading and meat science results for the full cohort will be analysed through BREEDPLAN and sire averages produced and published in updated Progeny Performance reports. It is envisaged the data will be analysed in the February 2016 BREEDPLAN analysis (i.e. available in late January 2016).

A summary of the overall carcase performance statistics for the Cohort 3 steers is tabled below:

 

Live Wt

(kg)

Carcase Wt (kg)

Dressing %

P8 Fat

(mm)

Rib Fat

(mm)

Ossification

(Score)

MSA Marbling (Score)

AUSMEAT Marbling

(Score)

EMA

(cm2)

MSA Index

Av.

809

460

56.8%

21.0

18.7

151.4

508.7

3.04

93.8

65.0

Max

976

562.8

61.5%

40

40

180

890

8

124

70.2

Min

598

334.9

50.0%

10

6

140

280

1

66

60.4

 

As background, the ASBP steers are purchased by Rangers Valley and enter Tullimba Research feedlot at around 450kg average live weight with most steers being in the 400 to 500 kg range. They are on feed for approximately 100 days in Tullimba undergoing net feed intake testing, before relocating to Rangers Valley feedlot for an additional 170 days to complete a total feeding period of 270 days. They are then processed at John Dee abattoir at Warwick where they are graded by Rangers Valley and Meat Standards Australia (MSA) graders.

Utilising the 270 day feeding period has several benefits in relation to genetic evaluation for carcase traits including:

• Maximising the variation and expression of the carcase traits, particularly marbling.

• Beef CRC research has shown that there was no re-ranking of sires for carcase traits, such as

  marbling, when progeny are finished on pasture or grain and slaughtered at different carcase weight

  end-points. The research did show greater expression of genetic differences when animals were

  finished on grain and slaughtered at heavier carcase weights.

• Ability to measure the steers on several occasions in the feeding period to further investigate the

  relationship between the carcase traits at different time points. For example all ASBP steers are

  ultrasound scanned at feedlot induction, again at Tullimba feedlot exit after 100 days and then direct

  carcase measurements at slaughter following the full 270 day feeding period.

Pictured top: Striploin samples from each carcase have been submitted to the UNE Meat Science Laboratory for testing for a range of beef quality traits.

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