When ‘why’ is more important than ‘what’

January 24, 2020 4:26 pm

Communication is often a described as a two way street, but I think it is better described as an intersection.

You need to understand why your customers do what they do in order to communicate your key messages back to them. The cross over – or intersection – between yours and their ‘whys’ is where potential lies for an increased and loyal following as well as higher engagement levels.

In todays’ world we need to focus on more than a marketing strategy (which yes, is still important), we also need to focus on creating a positive conversation, pin pointing common threads as to why and when your customers do the things they do.

For example instead of being silent until it is time to sell your bulls, start at a common interest point, begin the conversation when your calves drop or during weaning. You can guarantee you won’t be the only one selling a similar product in the same timeframe, so the conversation you started a year ago may make the crucial point of difference you need.

It is important to understand to whom you are communicating with, and how they are making decisions on future purchases. Our previous article ‘Understanding  target markets’ may help you understand this process better.

“Research tells us consumers  use rule sets  or past experience that turn into “habits” or “autopilot” responses,” (Shelley (Carter) Farro). As a consumer yourself you would find yourself loyal to certain brands with the  reasoning long forgotten, well as you can imagine this extends  to your customers as well. It is within your power to cause     a potential client to review their choices and influence a further purchase path.

How? Give them a reason! Are you a young entrepreneur breaking into the industry? Let them know. Are you providing a superior product? Let them know. Sometimes it is easy to forget that people want someone to guide them through their purchase journey.

We want a reason to like you, follow you, engage with you, talk about you and if we find your brand speaks to us and our core values or needs, then we want to buy from you.

Your ‘why’ can be your most important branding asset.

“As consumers, we like to think we favour a brand because of objective factors, such as product quality or price. But insights from psychology suggest that our feelings and identities may have a greater influence on which brands we choose,” (Skye Pathare).

Visual identities can always be developed and strengthened, your product can always remain consistent or be bettered and you can always change up your marketing techniques, but your ‘why’ will prevail, because it’s who you are and what sets you apart that consumers are looking for.

For example, The Angus Australia brand may develop over the years, and we may develop new initiatives but our ‘why’ will always be to Promote and Enhance the value of Angus.

What is your brands purpose? What need are you fulfilling? How do you inspire consumers to believe in your brand?

These are all things you need to consider as part of your marketing and branding strategies. If you can answer these and effectively communicate your insights,  it  promotes  the opportunity to create an authentic connection with customers and potentially develop long lasting relationships with them.

One tip; never underestimate how branding your tone of voice can reinforce your ‘why’. You can have a fantastic message to communicate but the delivery can make all the difference with engagement levels.

For example, if presented with ‘Such and Such Angus, the ONLY breeders in the imaginary region’ or ‘Such and Such Angus, breeders with your local interests at heart’ which one are you going to feel more at ease with when researching further, and which one do you feel would be easier to deal with long term?

With transparency becoming one of the key drivers for purchase choice, it is in your best interests to embrace it not fight it.

For all things marketing related, see our resources page under the marketing tab on the Angus Australia website.

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